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You once referred to computing as pop culture.

It is. Complete pop culture. I’m not against pop culture. Developed music, for instance, needs a pop culture. There’s a tendency to over-develop. Brahms and Dvorak needed gypsy music badly by the end of the 19th century. The big problem with our culture is that it’s being dominated, because the electronic media we have is so much better suited for transmitting pop-culture content than it is for high-culture content. I consider jazz to be a developed part of high culture. Anything that’s been worked on and developed and you [can] go to the next couple levels.

One thing about jazz aficionados is that they take deep pleasure in knowing the history of jazz.

Yes! Classical music is like that, too. But pop culture holds a disdain for history. Pop culture is all about identity and feeling like you’re participating. It has nothing to do with cooperation, the past or the future — it’s living in the present. I think the same is true of most people who write code for money. They have no idea where [their culture came from] — and the Internet was done so well that most people think of it as a natural resource like the Pacific Ocean, rather than something that was man-made. When was the last time a technology with a scale like that was so error-free? The Web, in comparison, is a joke. The Web was done by amateurs.

From Interview with Alan Kay, the second grumpiest programmer in the world. (The first is Ted Nelson). (via programmingisterrible)

alan kay, everyone.

(via roomthily)

Quote IconYou can’t manage dogmatically. I think CEOs who favour meritocracy naively believe it will sort out the human issues they don’t want to deal with.

markury

Quote IconClassic big company problem: you hire people and they need to “do” things and “make an impact”. Fuck that. Grind the meat and fill the sausage you designer child.

markury

I’ve liked my Ouya, but after the initial honeymoon move through playing some of those games, I’m basically only using it for NES/SNES emulator games now.

I really want a platform that puts indies first, and Ouya could have been that, but unfortunately, it doesn’t look that’s going to ever happen now.

putthison:

There are steps that can be taken to alter one’s appearance to fall in line with one’s personal desires — make-up, high-heels, contact lenses, or in this case, wigs — but perhaps it’s worth examining the underlying aspects of what your appearance means to you and the world. The body is a vehicle within which we get to experience what it’s like to be alive. It’s not you who’s losing his hair, it’s your body that’s losing its hair. This is a challenging and often painful realization, but each of us is not really our body at all. It’s just a place-holder — a point of entry.

Often times, we get so caught up in how we relate to our appearance, that we forget almost every other aspect of what it is to be ourselves. Usually what we value about other people has ultimate very little to do with how they look — it has much more to do with how they are. Caring too much about our looks — and that includes our weight, our height, our hair, our face, etc — becomes an easy surface game to play and to keep us occupied so we don’t have to dig deeper into life’s more challenging and important games.

Yesterday afternoon, dog pulled his bed from the left side of the room to right under my desk (and whined until the space heater followed). He’s sat at my feet since then. This guy really is my bestedest friend.